Traffic Enforcement ” Thanksgiving Safe Arrival”

The Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) will underwrite overtime enforcement efforts through a grant for the Thanksgiving Safe Arrival traffic enforcement campaign.

Starting Monday through Sunday (November 20 – 26, 2017) The Galena Police Department will join the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office, Kansas Highway Patrol and many other agencies across the state to help insure the safe arrival of family and friend to their destinations throughout the holiday weekend.

According to KDOT, the Thanksgiving holiday period outranks all other major holidays in the number of crashes that impairment is cited as a factor. Failure of adults to simply buckle up or to insure child passengers are properly restrained is a contributing factor in severe and/or disabling injuries to include death of passengers involved in crashes. Drivers and passengers in Kansas are twice as likely to be seriously injured or killed in crashes from being unrestrained than ones that are properly restrained.  They go on to state that occupants in alcohol-or other drug related crashes are more than 2 ½ times more likely to be injured or killed.

Arrange a ride with a non-drinking acquaintance if you are plaining on drinking any amount of at all. Drivers, always wear your seatbelt and don’t move the vehicle until each person riding with you is buckled in. This is your best defense against death and injury, it’s their best defense, and it’s the law.   You will live with the consequences – good or bad – the rest of your life.  By always following these simple rules, you can preserve life – maybe your life – and certainly your cash.  You can safely arrive.”

You Drink, You Drive, You Lose

Be warned that during the period, August 17 through Labor Day, September 4, The Galena Police Departmenthtt will join 150 other local and state police agencies across the state in a crackdown aimed at removing drunk, drugged, and other dangerous drivers from the roadways. Titled, You Drink. You Drive. You Lose., the enforcement campaign is sponsored by the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

Kansas averages three persons injured every day, and one person killed every three days, in crashes where at least one of the drivers involved is impaired by alcohol and/or another drug.  According to KDOT, over the past eight years the yearly proportion of fatality crashes attributable to alcohol/drug impairment has fluctuated between 22% and 35%.  The agency also reports that crashes involving impaired drivers are likely to be more severe than are other crashes.  For example, drivers and passengers who are involved in such crashes are more than twice as likely to be non-fatally injured, four times as likely to suffer serious injury, and eight times more likely to die from their injuries, than if impairment is not a factor.

  1. We are asking all citizens on the roadways – drivers and passengers – to watch for suspicious driving behaviors. Note the location, a description of the suspect vehicle, along with its direction of travel, and call 911 as soon as it’s safe to do so. You may save a life.
  2. You can count on this department to vigorously enforce impaired driving and other traffic laws, not just during this campaign, but through the year.
  3. Always remember that Restraints save lives and reduce injury severity across a wide range of driving mistakes and mishaps. A person’s best protection while in a vehicle is the use of seat belts and appropriate child restraints – every trip, every time.

High Visibility Speed Enforcement

Beginning July 21st thru July 23rd, The Galena Police Department will join other Law Enforcement agencies in Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Arkansas, Missouri and Oklahoma to stop what has been an epidemic that often has fatal consequences, “speeding” on our streets and highways.

In an effort to change this trend, law enforcement across the six-state area will be extra-vigilant when patrolling around city, rural state and federal highways. As speed increases, the severity of crashes increases, leading to a rise in fatalities and/or serious injuries. Officers are educating drivers and passengers regarding the importance of slowing down, using restraints and not driving while impaired.

There should be no surprises when it comes to this enforcement effort. Officers will issue citations to any individual who refuses to obey traffic laws, whether it is for speeding, texting, driving while impaired or failing to buckle up.

Chief Charles says, “Even one death is unacceptable. Please slow down, put the phone away or turn it off, and always buckle up.”

 

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Click It or Ticket Begins May 22, 2017

Click It or Ticket is on its way

Beginning on Monday, May 22, and continuing through Sunday, June 4, drivers can expect increased police presence on city streets as the Galena Police Department joins almost 160 other law enforcement agencies in aggressively enforcing Kansas occupant restraint and other traffic laws as part of the 2017 Kansas Click It or Ticket campaign.  This activity is supported by a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).  Enforcement will occur around the clock.  Officers will be especially vigilant at night because the likelihood of seatbelt use at night is much lower than during the day and the percentage of unrestrained crash deaths soars much higher at night.

Drivers can expect strict enforcement of both the Safety Belt Use Act and the Child Passenger Safety Act. These

acts require that all vehicle occupants must be appropriately restrained. Law enforcement officers can stop vehicles and issue tickets when they observe front seat occupants, teens in any position, or children under the age of 14, riding without being properly restrained.  Occupants, ages 14 and over, are cited individually.  In the event that a passenger under the age of 14 is observed to be unrestrained the driver will be cited.  The fine for an adult violation is $10 (no court cost).  The fine for a youth (14-17) violation is $60 (no court costs), while the driver’s fine for a child (0-13) restraint violation is $60 + a court cost charge of at least $108.

Children under the age of four must be correctly secured in an approved child safety seat. Children, ages four through seven, must be securely belted into an approved booster seat unless taller than 4 feet 9 inches or heavier than 80 pounds, in which case, the booster may be removed and the child belted in without it.  Children, ages eight through 13 must be safety-belted.   In addition, the act prohibits persons under the age of 14 from riding in any part of a vehicle not intended for carrying passengers, such as a pickup bed.

The aim of Click It or Ticket is simple:  to drastically reduce the number of preventable deaths and injuries that occur when unbelted drivers and passengers are involved in traffic crashes.  While seat belts may not always protect from serious or fatal injury, certainly no other piece of equipment within the vehicle provides more protection.

Kansas’ overall adult seat belt compliance rate is 87% and ranges, by county, from 61% to 96%, with occupants in rural counties generally less likely to buckle up than those in urban counties. According to KDOT, this rural-urban difference in seat belt rates is especially problematic because rural roadway conditions are, in general, less forgiving than those in urban areas and the consequences of driver misjudgment – such as unsafe speed and failure to buckle up – are likely to be more severe.  Picture, for example, two lanes, narrow shoulders, ditches on both sides, and random culverts waiting to snag vehicles leaving the roadway.  Or, consider the rollover crash, which is so much more prevalent on rural roadways than city streets.  One of the grimmest duties a police officer is called upon to perform is to work a crash where an unrestrained occupant is partially or completely ejected, and then crushed by the rolling vehicle.  It is easy to see why fully two-thirds of Kansas’ fatality crashes occur on rural roadways even though they see only one-third of all crashes.

Kansans like to see their state as one which protects children, and it does well with its youngest ones, those aged 0-4, who are buckled in to child safety seats at the rate of 97%. However, the percentage of properly restrained 5- to 13-year olds is only 84%.  Moreover, eight out of ten times when drivers, themselves, are unbelted, their child passengers are also unsecured.

According to Chief Charles, “I would like remind the community that when they don’t buckle up themselves, or require their passengers to buckle up, they are, in effect, promising themselves and those passengers, along with family and friends not present, that no circumstance will arise that will trigger seat belt activation. That the drivers they will encounter on the road are not going to be critically affected by drug or medical impairment, sleepiness, cell phone conversations, texting, sloshing coffee, the radio dial or kids fighting in the back seat.  Nor will there be animals in the road or a mechanical or other circumstance that will cause them to suddenly slow or veer out of their lane.”

“I want people to know that, day or night, the Galena Police Department is committed to aggressively ticketing violators of seat belt and child safety laws, as well as other traffic infractions – such as speeding and texting while driving – which make the need for occupant restraint so necessary.”

THANKSGIVING TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT CAMPAIGN

For Immediate Release

Beginning Monday, November 21, through Sunday, November 27, The Galena Police Department will join many other police agencies across the state, including the Kansas Highway Patrol, in the Kansas Thanksgiving Traffic Enforcement Campaign. A grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) will underwrite overtime enforcement efforts that specifically aim at removing impaired drivers from our roads and ticketing vehicle occupants who are unrestrained or whose child passengers are unrestrained.

In comparison with other holidays, the Thanksgiving holiday period (Wednesday-Sunday) outranks all but New Year’s in average number of crashes in which driver impairment is cited as a factor.  Those driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs endanger not only themselves, but also others they share the road with – such as their passengers, other motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians.  On average, across Kansas, five persons are killed or injured in alcohol/drug-related crashes each day.  And the crashes tend to be more severe.  According to KDOT, which tracks all crashes in the state, vehicle occupants in alcohol- or other drug-related crashes are over 2 ½ times more likely to be injured or killed than those involved in crashes where alcohol or other drugs were not a factor.

Each week across Kansas, over 250 drivers are arrested for DUI (Driving Under the Influence).  A DUI conviction will result in jail time, the suspension or revocation of driver’s license, a fine of $500 to $2,500, participation in an alcohol or other drug treatment program, and the purchase and installation of an ignition interlock device in the offender’s vehicle.  This device requires the offender to blow into a device that measures blood alcohol concentration prior to starting the car.

Also responsible for needless death and maiming is the failure by many teens and adults to simply buckle up, or to properly buckle up child passengers.  Twice as many Kansans who die from a crash are unrestrained as are restrained.  Even worse is the fact that injuries suffered by those who are unbuckled are likely to be much more severe and disabling than injuries suffered by those who are buckled in.  This applies regardless of speed, and whether the occurrence is on a city street, a county road, or a highway.

“Keep in mind that if you are going to be drinking – any amount at all– don’t even consider driving home.  Arrange to ride with a non-drinking acquaintance.  Don’t let pride or concerns for your convenience endanger your life and the lives of innocent others.”

Drink and Drive? You Choose Your Ride!

On October 19, 2016 the Galena Police and Fire Department participated in an event that focused on the kids in the community. We would like to thanks the Sheriff’s Office for organizing, and MVP Athletics for hosting the “Drink and Drive? You Choose Your Ride!” event. We would also like to thank all the other organization  that donated their time and resources to make this event a success within the Galena Community.

 

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SPEED ENFORCEMENT: September 23rd -25th.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Beginning September 23rd thru September 25th, The Galena Police Department will join other Law Enforcement agencies in Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska Arkansas, Missouri and Oklahoma to stop what has been an epidemic for the past several years. That’s increased speeding on our streets and highways.

In an effort to change this trend, law enforcement across the six-state area will be extra-vigilant when patrolling around city, rural state and federal highways. As speed increase the severity of crashes increase including deaths, officers have educated and warned passengers and drivers regarding the importance of slowing down, using restraints and not driving while impaired.

There should be no surprises when it comes to this enforcement effort. Officers will issue citations to any individual who refuses to obey the traffic laws, whether it is for speeding, texting, driving while impaired or failing to buckle up.

Chief Charles says, “Even one death is unacceptable. Please slow down, put the phone away or turn it off, and always buckle up.”

You Drink You Drive You Lose Reminder

Starting August 18 through Labor Day, September 5, The Galena Police Department will join almost 150 other local and state police agencies across the state in a crackdown aimed at removing drunk, drugged, and other dangerous drivers from the roadways. Billed as You Drink. You Drive. You Lose., the enforcement is underwritten by a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

You Drink. You Drive. You Lose

letter head

 

August 17, 2016

Ref: You Drink. You Drive. You Lose.

Starting August 18 through Labor Day, September 5, The Galena Police Department will join almost 150 other local and state police agencies across the state in a crackdown aimed at removing drunk, drugged, and other dangerous drivers from the roadways. Billed as You Drink. You Drive. You Lose., the enforcement is underwritten by a grant from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

Kansas averages four persons injured every day, and one person killed every three days, in crashes where at least one of the drivers involved is impaired by alcohol and/or another drug.  According to KDOT, crashes involving impaired drivers are likely to be much more severe than other crashes.  This is why persons involved in such a crash – in any capacity – are more than twice as likely to be injured, and 12 times more likely to die from their crash injuries, than if the crash does not involve impairment.  Another way to think of this is to compare ratios of death-to-injury.  There is one death for every 13 injuries among crashes in which a driver is impaired as compared with one death for every 60 injuries among crashes where impairment is not a factor.

According to Chief Billy Charles, “I want the You Drink. You Drive. You Lose campaign to remind drivers of several things:

“First, if you’re going to drink while away from home, do it responsibly. Plan ahead and have someone lined up who is not going to be drinking to get you back. Don’t make the mistake of waiting until it’s time to go home to start asking around.  Chances are, if you do that you will wind up with someone who may be more sober than yourself, but not sober enough.

“Second, picture families you know, and then consider how it would be to wake up every day to the memory of your decision to drive after drinking – a decision which unintentionally brought injury or death to one of them. If you’re driving impaired, you are not only more likely to crash, but you are much more likely to cause serious injury – even death – to yourself and others when you do crash.

“Third, even if you appear to be driving well enough to get by, we may still be able to pull you over for a number of other traffic offences. If we do this and we detect a hint of alcohol you will be tested.  If you fail the test you’re looking at a fine of $500-$2,500; up to one year in jail; the suspension, or even permanent loss, of your driver’s license; increased insurance premiums; and the purchase and installation of an ignition interlock device in your car.  Imagine not being able to start your car without blowing into the interlock’s alcohol sensor several times during an afternoon’s errands.  How do you tell your boss why you cannot drive a company car?  Add in an attorney’s fees and you may tie up $13,000 or more before all is said and done, and you still may not be off the hook.  Don’t take the chance; it’s not worth it.

“Fourth, we need everyone to be our eyes on the road. If you see suspicious driving behaviors take note of location, direction and the vehicle’s description, and call 911 as soon as it’s safe to do so.  You may save a life.

“Fifth, you can count on this department to vigorously enforce impaired driving laws – not just during this campaign, but all year long.

“Finally, always remember that the best protection against a drunk driver (even when it’s yourself) is the use of seat belts and appropriate child restraints – every trip, every time.  They save lives and reduce injury severity across Galena.”

 

Memorial Day Weekend Enforcement

Nighttime Seatbelt / Impaired Driving Enforcement

On May 27th the Galena Police Department will be joining other local and state law enforcement agencies to kick off the Memorial Day Weekend enforcement period.

There should be no Surprise when it comes to this enforcement effort. Officers will issue citations to any individual who refuses to obey traffic laws, weather it is for speeding, texting while driving, failing to buckle up or driving while impaired. A special emphasis will be placed on nighttime seatbelt usages. If a driver is unrestrained or driving while impaired, they will be cited, day or night.